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Breast Cancer

Breast Cancer

New Hope Unlimited has found that many times symptoms may be improved and possibly reversed with our alternative breast cancer treatments.

New Hope Unlimited understands breast cancer treatment. Our medical and scientific professionals have devoted their lives to developing aggressive breast cancer treatment protocols that are both effective and noninvasive. We understand that treating breast cancer is about more than just treating the illness. Breast cancer can negatively affect not only your physical health, but also your emotional and spiritual well-being. We are dedicated to standing with you in the fight against breast cancer, but we are also here to support you in any other way we can. New Hope Unlimited offers individualized treatment programs that focus on eliminating the tumor, rebuilding the immune system, and promoting overall wellness throughout the
recovery process.

 

Contents of this article:

Breast cancer is currently the most common form of cancer among women. Most patients with this diagnosis have likely had the cancerous mass for 5 to 10 years before the diagnosis. Cancers can be easily felt in the breast when they reach a size of approximately 1 cm. A lump of this size contains approximately one billion cells, which is the result of 30 doublings of a single cancer cell. Assuming that a breast lump grows with a doubling time of 100 days, it would take approximately 10 years to reach a point where it could be felt.

Breast cancer may metastasize to almost any organ in the body if not stopped. The most common sites are skin around a lumpectomy or mastectomy scar, scalp, lymph nodes, bone, lung, liver, and brain. New Hope Unlimited’s innovative holistic treatment programs are designed to rebuild the immune system in order to help prevent any further progression or reoccurrence.

Types of Breast Cancer

types of breast cancerThere are several types and stages of Breast Cancer. Breast tumors can be either benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Our team of physicians and researchers understands that each type of breast cancer responds to treatment in different ways. Basically, each cancer type and location is unique. This is why New Hope Unlimited works in conjunction with the patient and her primary care physician to develop an individualized treatment protocol in order to effectively reduce the size and symptoms of the breast cancer.

  • Inflammatory Breast Cancer is characterized by a diffused inflammation and enlargement of the breast, sometimes without a mass.
  • Ductal Carcinoma in Situ is the most common type of noninvasive breast cancer. These cancer cells are found within the milk ducts but have not yet spread into the breast tissue.
  • Invasive Ductal Carcinoma is the most common type of invasive breast cancer, and is responsible for approximately 80% of all cancers. These cancer cells are found in both the milk ducts and the breast tissue. Invasive ductal carcinoma may spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body if not stopped.
  • Invasive Lobular Carcinoma is responsible for approximately 10% to 15% of all breast cancers.  These cancer cells first grow in the lobes of the breast and have the ability to metastasize to other parts of the breast and also to other parts of the body.

 

Breast cancer cases also differ by stages. Here’s a brief description of the different progressive levels of the disease.

Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ)
There are two types of Stage 0 Breast Cancer: Lobular Carcinoma in Situ (LCIS) and Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS). In LCIS, there are abnormal cells in a lobule’s lining. Even though a diagnosis of LCIS in one breast increases the risk of cancer for both breasts, the cancer is usually noninvasive. In DCIS, there are abnormal cells in a duct’s lining. Although the abnormal cells found in DCIS have not yet moved to the other breast tissue, the cancer can become invasive if left untreated.

Stage I
The tumor is Stage I Breast Cancer is no larger than three-quarters of an inch (approximately 2cm) across. Stage I is considered an early stage invasive cancer, although cancer cells have not yet spread to other parts of the body.

Stage II
A Stage II tumor is typically between 2cm to 5cm (three-quarters of an inch to 2 inches) across. It is possible that during Stage II, the cancer has spread to lymph nodes near the breast.

Stage III
Stage III is considered a locally advanced cancer. This means that the cancer has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes.

Stage IV
Stage IV cancer has spread to other parts of the body. New Hope Unlimited’s treatment strategy for Stage IV cancer focuses on each cancer site individually in order to effectively reduce symptoms and improve the patient’s quality of life during recovery.

Symptoms

Most breast cancers are discovered as a lump by the female herself. Some females may have a history of pain with no mass; however, this presentation is less common. The following are possible breast cancer symptoms:

  • breast enlargement
  • a thickening of the breast tissue
  • nipple dimpling
  • nipple discharge
  • nipple erosion or ulceration
  • lymph node enlargement around the breast area or under the arms
  • reddening or thickening of the skin of the breast
  • warmth and itching
  • Pain – While most breast cancers are not painful, the presence of pain should not lead to a false security that it’s not cancer. Approximately 10% of patients may present with breast pain and no mass.

It is very important to consult a physician when experiencing breast cancer symptoms. The most effective orthodox or alternative treatment for cancer is early detection and treatment.

 

Possible Risk Factors of Breast Cancer

breast cancer factorsThe risk for breast cancer increases with age. Worldwide breast cancer tendency rates appear to correspond with variations in diet, especially a high fat intake diet and high alcohol intake. The BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 genes are inherited genes and account for only about 3% of breast cancers. If a woman has already had cancer in one breast, she should be aware that she has an increased risk for getting cancer in the other breast. Women with early periods (menarche), late menopause, and late first pregnancy are at increased risk. Women how have been exposed to radiation at an early age are at higher risk.

Various chemicals such as arsenic, aflatoxin, vinyle chloride, and benzene show definite evidence of causing human cancers. Other human carcinogens based on evidence from animal experiments are chloroform, dichloro-diphenyl-trichlorethane (DDT), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB’s), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and formaldehyde.

 

The exact cause of breast cancer is still unknown, but there are known factors that can affect a person’s risk of developing the disease. And these are:

  • Age – Getting older increases the risk for the disease and most invasive cancer cases have been diagnosed in women aged 55 and older.
  • Gender – Being a woman or female alone makes you more prone to breast cancer as compared to males. However, it’s important to note that breast cancer can also occur in men.
  • Inherited genes – The BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 genes are inherited genes and account for about 3% of breast cancers.
  • Family history – If you have first-degree relatives who had breast cancer, you may be two to three times more at risk for breast cancer.
  • History of breast cancer – If a woman already had cancer in one breast, she should be aware that she has an increased risk of getting cancer in the other breast.
  • Early menstruation and late menopause – Women who menstruated before 12 years old early or went through menopause later than age 55 are more prone to breast cancer because they are exposed to estrogen longer.
  • Radiation exposure – Women who were exposed to radiation treatment to the chest are at a higher risk for breast cancer.
  • Breast density – women with denser breasts are 1.2 to 2 times more likely to develop breast cancer than a woman with an average breast density.
  • Late pregnancy– Women who had their first child after age 30 has a slightly higher chance of developing breast cancer than those who became pregnant at a younger age.
  • Obesity or being overweight – being over the ideal weight can have an effect on your risk for breast cancer. However, it’s still a case to case basis and may vary depending on what age you put on the weight and which part of the body has more excess fat.
  • Physical activity – Exercise can help reduce breast cancer risk. 1.25 to 2.5 hours of brisk walking in a week can reduce breast cancer risk by 18%.
  • Birth control – Contraceptive use can slightly increase a woman’s risk for breast cancer.

There are other breast cancer risk factors that are still being investigated such as diet and vitamins, chemical exposure, tobacco smoke, and working night shifts. Current findings are still inconclusive about their link with breast cancer. Meanwhile, previously believed breast cancer risk factors such as antiperspirants, wearing bras, induced abortion, and breast implants have been found to have no link with a person’s chances of developing cancer.

 

Diagnostic Tests for Detection

Breast cancer can be detected through several tests such as:

  • Breast exam – Breast exams can be done at home. In fact, some experts suggest doing self-breast examinations once a woman reaches her 20s. This helps you determine or spot any changes or lumps in the breast.

Breast exams can also be done by a doctor. During the procedure, lymph nodes in the armpit and the breast will be felt to detect lumps and other possible symptoms of breast cancer.

  • Mammogram – Mammogram is an imaging test conducted on the breast. It can help detect changes, abnormalities, and lumps that may take two years more before they can be felt or apparent through normal breast exams.
  • Breast Ultrasound – Breast ultrasound is a type of imaging test that helps detect whether the lump found in the breast is a solid mass or a cyst that’s filled with fluid.
  • Biopsy – Biopsy is performed to determine the presence of cancer in the breast. It is done through collecting samples and having them tested in the laboratory.
  • Breast MRI – Breast MRI is another type of imaging test done in order to generate a clear picture of the inside of your breast. A dye will be injected prior to the test.

 

Breast Cancer Treatment Options

New Hope Medical Center understands breast cancer treatment. Our medical and scientific professionals have devoted their lives to developing aggressive breast cancer treatment protocols that are both effective and noninvasive. We understand that treating breast cancer is about more than just treating the illness. Breast cancer can negatively affect not only your physical health, but also your emotional and spiritual well-being. We are dedicated to standing with you in the fight against breast cancer, but we are also here to support you in any other way we can.

New Hope Medical Center offers individualized treatment programs that focus on eliminating the tumor, rebuilding the immune system, and promoting overall wellness throughout the recovery process.

Our team of physicians and researchers understands that each type of breast cancer responds to treatment in different ways. Basically, each cancer type and location is unique. This is why we work in conjunction with the patient and her primary care physician to develop an individualized treatment protocol in order to effectively reduce the size and symptoms of the breast cancer.

 

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Cancer treatment programs may include, but are never limited to:

  • Anti-tumor intravenous therapy
  • Dendritic cell therapy
  • Advanced immunotherapy
  • Micro-dose chemotherapy
  • Ozone therapy
  • Hyperbaric oxygen therapy
  • Ultraviolet blood irradiation therapy
  • Far Infrared therapy
  • Nutritional guidance and lectures
  • Autologous Immunogen Therapy (AIT)*
  • Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT)

 


Through the years, New Hope Medical Center has helped cancer patients. Please get in touch with us to know how.

Glossary

  • Axillary: under the arm area.
  • Benign: not malignant; not recurrent; not cancerous.
  • Biopsy: the removal and examination of a small piece of tissue from the living body to determine if cancer cells are present.
  • Carcinogens: any substance that has the ability to cause cancer.
  • Carcinogenic: any substance that causes cancer.
  • Chemotherapy: a treatment for disease by using chemical agents.
  • Extended radical mastectomy: radical mastectomy with removal of the ipsilateral half of the sternum, a portion of the ribs, and the internal mammary lymph nodes.
  • Ipsilateral: pertaining to the same side as the affected breast.
  • Lumpectomy: a surgical excision or removal of only the palpable lesion or mass in the breast.
  • Malignancy: a cancerous growth which has the tendency to progress.
  • Mastectomy: removal of the breast.
  • Menarche: the beginning of a female’s monthly cycle.
  • Menopause: the ending of a female’s monthly cycle occurring usually around the age of 50.
  • Metastatic: the transfer of a cancer from one organ to another.
  • Modified radical mastectomy: a total mastectomy with axillary node removal but leaving the pectoral muscle.
  • Palpable: being able to touch or feel the lump.
  • Radiation: a treatment for disease using high-frequency ionizing radiation.
  • Tumor: a growth of tissue in which the division of cells is uncontrolled and progressive.

stop feeling helpless to your disease... you still have options!

480-473-9808

stop feeling helpless to your disease... you still have options!

480-473-9808
New Hope Medical